Artemis I Launch Highlights: NASA Artemis I Launch Called Off Due To Technical Issues With SLS Rocket Engine

Artemis I Launch Highlights: NASA Artemis I Launch Called Off Due To Technical Issues With SLS Rocket Engine

Home Science Artemis I Launch Highlights: NASA Artemis I Launch Called Off Due To Technical Issues With SLS Rocket Engine

Artemis I: NASA was set to launch Artemis I, the first leg of the Artemis Moon mission, on August 29, 2022. However, the mission was scrubbed due to technical issues with one of the engines of SLS.

Artemis I Launch Highlights: NASA Artemis I Launch Called Off Due To Technical Issues With SLS Rocket Engine

Artemis I Launch Highlights: NASA Artemis I Launch Called Off Due To Technical Issues With SLS Rocket Engine

The launch of Artemis I on Monday, August 29, was scrubbed due to a technical problem with one of the engines of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. As a result, the first leg of NASA’s Moon mission has been postponed. 

NASA said in a mission update that the US space agency will keep everyone posted on the timing of the next launch attempt.

The launch director halted Monday’s launch attempt of Artemis I at approximately 8:34 am EDT (6:04 pm IST). 

A few hours before the launch attempt, NASA engineers were troubleshooting a conditioning issue with one of the RS-25 engines of the SLS, the world’s most powerful rocket. Launch controllers increased the pressure on the core stage tanks to condition the engines, and to cause some of the cryogenic propellant to bleed to the engines. This is an important step because it ensures the engines can reach the proper temperature range to get started.

However, NASA teams observed an issue with the bleeding of engine number 3. As a result, the mission was scrubbed. 

Artemis I Launch LIVE: Monday’s Launch Attempt Scrubbed Due To Malfunctioning Of SLS Engine, Mission Postponed

Monday’s launch attempt of Artemis I was scrubbed due to an issue in engine number 3 of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. Therefore, the first leg of NASA’s Moon mission has been postponed to Friday, September 2. 

The launch of #Artemis I is no longer happening today as teams work through an issue with an engine bleed. Teams will continue to gather data, and we will keep you posted on the timing of the next launch attempt. https://t.co/tQ0lp6Ruhv pic.twitter.com/u6Uiim2mom

— NASA (@NASA) August 29, 2022 Artemis I Launch LIVE: Launch Of First Leg Of Artemis Program Currently In Unplanned Hold, NASA Says

The launch of Artemis I, the first leg of the Artemis Moon mission, is currently in an unplanned hold, NASA said in a mission update. The Artemis team is working on an issue with engine number 3 on the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. 

#Artemis I update: Launch is currently in an unplanned hold as the team works on an issue with engine number 3 on the @NASA_SLS core stage. Operations commentary continues at https://t.co/z1RgZwQkWS https://t.co/mFyoeRMC6q

— NASA (@NASA) August 29, 2022 Artemis I Launch LIVE: Orion Stacked Up And ‘Sitting Pretty’ Atop SLS, ESA Says

The Orion space capsule is stacked up and ‘sitting pretty’ atop the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, the European Space Agency (ESA) said in a mission update. ESA also said that it is proud to contribute the European Service Module for Artemis I. 

— Human Spaceflight (@esaspaceflight) August 29, 2022 On its way from Earth orbit to the Moon, Orion will be propelled by a service module provided by the ESA. The module will course-correct as needed along the way, and will supply the spacecraft’s main propulsion system and power.

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Artemis I Launch Live: Astronauts Express Excitement Before Launch Of NASA’s Moon Mission

European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Alexander Gerst has expressed his excitement for the launch of Artemis I. Gerst shared a picture on Twitter with fellow ESA astronauts Thomas Pesquet and Luca Parmitano, with the caption, “Suspense”.

Artemis I Launch Live: Launch Window For First Leg Of NASA’s Moon Mission Opens In Less Than An Hour

The launch window for Artemis I, the first leg of NASA’s Artemis Moon mission, will open in less than an hour. Artemis I will blast off into space no earlier than 6:03 pm IST on August 29. The hydrogen team of the NASA Space Launch System Rocket is discussing plans with the Artemis I launch director, NASA said in a mission update.

Artemis 1 Launch LIVE: NASA Engineers Troubleshoot SLS Engine Conditioning Issues, Assess Crack On Core Stage

NASA engineers have completed the process of replenishing the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with liquid hydrogen. The liquid oxygen tank has also been fully loaded. The engineers are troubleshooting a conditioning issue of one of the RS-25 engines of the world’s most powerful rocket, the SLS. 

Launch controllers increase the pressure on the core stage tanks to condition the engines. This causes some of the cryogenic propellant to bleed to the engines. As a result, the engines can reach the proper temperature range to get started. 

According to NASA, a crack has appeared on the thermal protection system material on one of the flanges on the core stage. NASA Exploration Ground Systems are assessing the crack. Flanges on the core stage are like a seam on a shirt, and are connection joints affixed at the top and bottom of the intertank. As a result, the two tanks of SLS can be attached to the flanges.

Artemis I Launch Live: How To Watch The Launch Of The First Leg Of NASA’s Moon Mission

Artemis I Livestream: NASA is launching Artemis I, the first leg of the Artemis Moon mission, on Monday, August 29, 2022. The launch window for Artemis I will remain open from 6:03 pm IST to 8:03 pm IST. 

Artemis I is an uncrewed flight that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration, and is the first integrated test of NASA’s deep space exploration systems. The Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, and the ground systems at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida are the US space agency’s deep space exploration systems. 

The uncrewed flight will take off from Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The Artemis Project, the first human mission since 1972, aims to carry the first woman, and the first person of colour to the Moon, by 2024.

The Artemis mission has three stages, Artemis I, II, and III.

How To Watch The Launch Of Artemis I Live?

The coverage for the fuelling of the SLS rocket on the Artemis I mission began at 9:30 pm IST on August 28.

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Despite the rain around the Artemis launchpad, the weather “hold” has been lifted, and NASA Exploration Ground Systems have started the process of chilldown for the fuel line and tanks, the European Space Agency (ESA) said in a mission update.

At around 11:38 am IST, the process of fast filling of liquid oxygen into the SLS core stage began, NASA said in a mission update. The core stage was eight per cent filled with liquid oxygen. 

At around 11:57 am IST, the slow filling of liquid hydrogen into the SLS core stage began.

SLS is loaded with more than 7,00,000 gallons of cryogenic propellants, according to NASA. 

The launch coverage for Artemis I began at 6:30 am ET (4:00 pm IST) on August 29. Launch coverage will continue through translunar injection and spacecraft separation, which will set Orion on its path to lunar orbit. 

One can watch the livestream of the launch of Artemis I in 4K on the official YouTube channel of NASA.

People can also watch the Artemis mega Moon rocket lift off while they chat on the official NASA channel on Twitch, an interactive live streaming service. 

The launch of Artemis I will also be streamed live via the official Facebook account of NASA. 

NASA will also broadcast the launch of Artemis I on the official Twitter account of the US space agency. 

The guests who will be present for the launch day webcast include actors like Chris Evans, Jack Black and Keke Palmer. 

NASA will also deliver comprehensive coverage of post-launch activities. There will be a post-launch news conference at around 12:00 pm ET (9:30 pm IST) on August 29. 

At 5:30 pm ET on August 29 (2:30 am IST on August 30), NASA will show the world Orion’s first imagery of the Earth following translunar injection.

Background

Artemis I: NASA is set to launch Artemis I, the first leg of the Artemis Moon mission, on August 29, 2022. The first integrated test of NASA’s deep space exploration systems, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration.

Artemis I will take off from Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch window will remain open from 8:33 am EDT to 10:33 am EDT (6:03 pm IST to 8:03 pm IST) on August 29. 

The Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, and the ground systems at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida are the US space agency’s deep space exploration systems. 

The Artemis project, the first human moon mission since 1972, aims to carry the first woman, and the first person of colour to the Moon, by 2024. 

The first spaceflight that landed humans on the lunar surface was Apollo 11 on July 20, 1969, and the last one was Apollo 17 on December 11, 1972. 

Artemis, the Goddess of the Moon in Greek Mythology, after whom NASA’s upcoming Moon mission has been named, was the twin sister of Apollo. 

The objective behind the Artemis Mission is that it will enable NASA to demonstrate new technologies on the Moon, which will pave the way for future exploration of Mars. 

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The Artemis Mission has three stages, Artemis I, II, and III. 

NASA’s massive SLS rocket and Orion Space Capsule will carry astronauts into lunar orbit. From there, SpaceX’s Human Lander System (HLS) will ferry the astronauts to the Moon’s icy south pole. 

What Is Artemis I All About?

Artemis I will be an uncrewed test flight. Orion will be carried atop the super-heavy lift rocket, SLS, without any human in the capsule. If Artemis I is successful, it will be certified that the SLS and Orion can be used for the other two Artemis missions, which will be crewed flights. 

The duration of Artemis I will be 42 days, three hours, and 20 minutes. Orion will launch atop SLS, the most powerful rocket in the world, and will fly farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown. Over the course of the mission, Orion will travel a distance of approximately 4,50,000 kilometres from Earth and 64,000 kilometres beyond the far side of the Moon. The spacecraft will stay in space longer than any human spacecraft has without docking to a space station. Orion will also return home faster and hotter than ever before. 

Artemis I will demonstrate the performance of both Orion and SLS and test NASA’s capabilities to orbit the Moon and return to Earth. The first uncrewed test flight of the Artemis Program will pave the way for future missions to the lunar vicinity, including landing the first woman and the first person of colour on the surface of the Moon. 

The objective of Artemis I is to set the stage for human exploration into deep space, where astronauts will build and begin testing the systems near the Moon needed for lunar exploration missions and to other destinations farther from Earth, including the Red Planet. 

Where Is Artemis I Headed?

Orion will blast off into space atop SLS, from Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s modernised spaceport at Kennedy Space Center. SLS will be propelled by a pair of five-segment boosters and four RS-25 engines, and will reach the period of greatest atmospheric force within 90 seconds. After approximately two minutes, the solid rocket boosters will burn through their propellant and separate from the rocket. After approximately eight minutes, the core stages and RS-25 engines will deplete the propellant. 

Therefore, the core stage engines will jettison the boosters, service module panels, and launch abort system, and then shut down. After this, the core stage will separate from the spacecraft. This will leave Orion attached to the interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) that will propel the spacecraft toward the Moon. It is a single-engine hydrogen- or liquid oxygen-based system that provides in-space propulsion after the solid rocket boosters and core stage are jettisoned.

As Orion orbits Earth and deploys its solar arrays, the ICPS will give the spacecraft the big push it needs to leave Earth’s orbit and travel toward the planet’s natural satellite. This manoeuvre is known as trans-lunar injection, according to NASA. The manoeuvre targets a point about the Moon that will guide Orion close enough to be captured by the Moon’s gravity.