After Cyrus Mistry Car Crash, Mumbai Police Posts Video Showing Why A Ride Without Rear Seat Belts On Is Dangerous

After Cyrus Mistry Car Crash, Mumbai Police Posts Video Showing Why A Ride Without Rear Seat Belts On Is Dangerous

Following the horrific and unfortunate road accident of former Tata Sons chairman Cyrus Mistry on Sunday (September 4), the Mumbai Police took to Twitter and shared a video emphasising the importance of seatbelts.

Cyrus Mistry was killed in a fatal car accident after his vehicle collided with a divider. Mistry and Jahangir Pandole were sitting in the back seat of the car without seat belts, according to the police’s initial investigation.

“A request to all Mumbaikars, please use seat belt,” the official Twitter handle of Mumbai Police shared a video of the crash impact if persons seated behind are not wearing seat belts. 

सर्व मुंबईकरांना एक विनंती, कृपया सीट बेल्टचा वापर करा.@MTPHereToHelp pic.twitter.com/rAxgRcZ0eG

— मुंबई पोलीस – Mumbai Police (@MumbaiPolice) September 5, 2022

According to the police, the driver’s “error of judgement” and excessive speeding were what led to the collision. Both Mistry and Jahangir perished in the collision, while the two passengers in the front who were buckled up survived.

Seat belts have been repeatedly shown to make the difference between life and death. Front seat belt use is required in India, while rear seat belt use is not as strictly enforced, despite the fact that there are prohibitions against unbuckled passengers.

Numerous studies have shown that the body experiences G forces (gravitational forces) as high as 10-30G during accidents, which is extremely harmful to human beings.

If not wearing a seat belt, G forces these high will fling the body all over the places inside the cabin and can inflict severe injuries, or in rare situations, can prove to be fatal to the occupants.

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The Mercedes car, in which Mistry was on board, covered a distance of 20 km in just nine minutes after crossing the Charoti check post in Maharashtra’s Palghar district, 120 km away from Mumbai, as per the police officials.

The car hit a road divider on a bridge over the Surya river, killing Mistry and Jahangir Pandole on the spot. The car was driven by Mumbai-based gynaecologist Anahita Pandole.