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    HomeBusinessScientists reveal mystery of how human brain processes emotions during deep sleep

    Scientists reveal mystery of how human brain processes emotions during deep sleep

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    The scientists stated in their study that they found that REM sleep is associated with a somatodendritic decoupling in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex.

    In a recent study, scientists at the University of Bern have found how sleep helps in processing emotions in humans. The study has revealed that the human brain processes emotions during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep to consolidate the storage of positive emotions and minimise the consolidation of negative emotions. The findings of the study were published in the journal Science last week.

    According to the scientists, the study provides a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the processing of emotions during sleep. The researchers claim that these findings may be in the development of new therapeutic targets for patients dealing with the maladaptive processing of traumatic memories, as is the case with patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

    The scientists stated in their study that they found that REM sleep is associated with a somatodendritic decoupling in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex.

    “This decoupling reflects a shift of inhibitory balance between parvalbumin neuron–mediated somatic inhibition and vasoactive intestinal peptide–mediated dendritic disinhibition, mostly driven by neurons from the central medial thalamus. Somatodendritic decoupling during REM sleep promotes opposite synaptic plasticity mechanisms that optimize emotional responses to future behavioral stressors,” the study stated.

    REM sleep is a mysterious state of sleep. According to scientists, it is a unique state of sleep during which most dreams occur together with intense emotional content. It is still unclear How and why these emotions are reactivated.

    “Our goal was to understand the underlying mechanism and the functions of such a surprising phenomenon,” Prof. Antoine Adamantidis from the Department of Biomedical Research (DBMR) at the University of Bern and the Department of Neurology at the Inselspital, University Hospital of Bern said.

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