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When driving a tuk-tuk pays more than making art

When driving a tuk-tuk pays more than making art thumbnail

Papier mache, a painstaking and delicate craft, is believed to have arrived in Kashmir in the 14th Century with Persian artisans. It has since become a specialty of the region, earning its practitioners awards and accolades. But in recent decades, the art has slowly lost its appeal amid growing unrest in the Indian-administered valley. Struggling…

Papier mache, a painstaking and delicate craft, is believed to have arrived in Kashmir in the 14th Century with Persian artisans. It has since become a specialty of the region, earning its practitioners awards and accolades.

But in recent decades, the art has slowly lost its appeal amid growing unrest in the Indian-administered valley. Struggling artisans have turned to other jobs to make ends meet – such as driving tuk-tuks or working as salesmen.

And they say their children are no longer interested in continuing what has long been a family legacy. Older artisans say they have no choice but to watch as a craft they once loved slowly dies.

Video by Aamir Peerzada

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