Australia

Venomous snake spotted in Sydney beach dunes

Locals were shocked to discover one of Australia’s most venomous snakes making its way along a widely-used beach path in Sydney’s Eastern suburbs recently.Spotted by a local and posted to the Maroubra Community Facebook page, beachgoers were warned to keep their eyes peeled on the walkway at Maroubra Beach, where the red-bellied black snake was…

Locals were shocked to discover one of Australia’s most venomous snakes making its way along a widely-used beach path in Sydney’s Eastern suburbs recently.

Spotted by a local and posted to the Maroubra Community Facebook page, beachgoers were warned to keep their eyes peeled on the walkway at Maroubra Beach, where the red-bellied black snake was photographed.

Locals were stunned by the find, and also urged dog-walkers to take care.

“She’s a biggy,” one person wrote.

“Yeah, not walking past there again,” a third local wrote.

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The sighting prompted South Maroubra Surf Life Saving Club to remind residents that they need to be careful of local wildlife.

“Just another reminder after one of our ‘red belly black snake’ neighbours was spotted very recently roaming around the coastal walkway just to the north of the club!” the South Maroubra Surf Club posted on Friday.
“Advice is stay out of bushes and vegetation in dune areas and watch your step on pathways!”

The medium-sized species has distinguishing black scales on its body and red scales underneath.

It is known to be a shy snake that only strikes when under extreme pressure or interference.

The venom from a red-bellied black snake bite can cause tissue damage and nausea but deaths are rare.

Even so, never approach the animals and always proceed with caution.

This time last year, snake catcher Tony Harrison told 9 News that Sydney’s cool, wet conditions are a dream for snakes.

“When you get a bit of rain, you can expect to see a red-bellied snake as they are frog-eaters,” he said. “It’s their favourite food.”

RELATED: Red-bellied snake found behind toaster

In the case of a bite, Mr Harrison advised to treat it as worst case scenario.

“Don’t drive yourself, call an ambulance straight away and give yourself first aid,” he said.

“If you do see a snake do not try and catch it yourself — that’s how people get themselves bitten.

“Snakes can get anywhere. You imagine a spot — I can guarantee I’ve found them there; cars, bikes, shoes … if they feel threatened, they will hide somewhere dark.”

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