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Glenn Close says Gwyneth didn’t deserve an Oscar

According to Glenn Close, the Academy missed the mark when it awarded Gwyneth Paltrow a best actress win in 1999 for Shakespeare In Love.During an interview with ABC News’ Popcorn with Peter Travers, the Hillbilly Elegy star, 73, praised actress Fernanda Montenegro, whose powerful performance in Central Station Close feels triumphed Paltrow’s.RELATED: Stars defend ‘worst…

According to Glenn Close, the Academy missed the mark when it awarded Gwyneth Paltrow a best actress win in 1999 for Shakespeare In Love.

During an interview with ABC News’ Popcorn with Peter Travers, the Hillbilly Elegy star, 73, praised actress Fernanda Montenegro, whose powerful performance in Central Station Close feels triumphed Paltrow’s.

RELATED: Stars defend ‘worst movie of 2020’

“I honestly feel that to be nominated by your peers is about as good as it gets. And then, I’ve never understood how you could honestly compare performances, you know?” Close – who has been nominated for an Oscar seven times – said.

“I remember the year Gwyneth Paltrow won over that incredible actress who was in ‘Central Station’ and I thought, ‘What?’ It doesn’t make sense.”

RELATED: Netflix movie to avoid: Hillbilly Elegy review

“So I think who wins has a lot of things to do with how things have been, you know, whether it has traction or whatever,” she continued.

“Publicity, how much money did they have to put it out in front of everybody’s sight. I have to be philosophical about it, if I was upset about it.”

Other Best Actress nominees that year included Meryl Streep for One True Thing, Cate Blanchett for Elizabeth and Emily Watson for Hilary and Jackie.

Meanwhile, Close is facing an avalanche of backlash for her latest role in critically-panned Netflix film Hillbilly Elegy.

The Ron Howard-directed movie was met with a slew of negative reviews following its release on Netflix earlier this week.

The film follows a Yale law student who returns to his home state of Ohio where he contemplates his family generations and his future.

It’s based on J.D. Vance’s book, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, which became a top seller after it was published in 2016.

Reviews claim the movie falls short in depicting the working class.

“The politically conservative, anti-welfare streak in the author’s writing feels surgically removed,” Rolling Stone’s David Fear writes, while The Independent critic deemed it an “irresponsible parade of death and despair”.

Responding to the criticism, Close said the film “wasn’t made with politics in mind”.

She went on to say Howard “succeeded magnificently to tell the story of a very specific family”.

This story originally appeared in the New York Post and was reproduced with permission

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