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SA records one new COVID case

South Australia has recorded just one new infection overnight, which was a close contact of the known cluster, according to the Premier. It brings the total number of recorded and suspected coronavirus infections linked to the cluster to 20.Speaking on breakfast radio shows ABC Radio and 5AA, Steven Marshall said it was an anxious time…

South Australia has recorded just one new infection overnight, which was a close contact of the known cluster, according to the Premier.

It brings the total number of recorded and suspected coronavirus infections linked to the cluster to 20.

Speaking on breakfast radio shows ABC Radio and 5AA, Steven Marshall said it was an anxious time for the state but welcomed the encouraging news.

“The good news is that overnight there’s been just one new infection,” Mr Marshall said.

“The advice was go hard and go early, and get on top of this straight away. We can’t let this get away and that’s what we did.

“What I’m pleased about is how quickly we’ve been able to get onto the situation at the moment. We put the net over SA yesterday.

“It’s still early days and there is still an anxious 24-48 hours ahead but the good news is it is a different situation to what we had yesterday morning.”

Following Monday’s spike in COVID cases, the Northern Territory, Queensland, Western Australia and Tasmania quickly closed their borders to the state, which was something Mr Marshall said he expected.

Some of South Australia’s federal politicians returned to Canberra on Monday night, ahead of a fortnight of parliament sitting in December, to reduce the risk.

“We’re putting excellent, transparent data through to all of those jurisdictions so their chief health officers can assess the risk and make decisions,” the Premier said.

“I expected yesterday that many would impose the border controls and restrictions but I think if we get on top of this, and that’s certainly our intention, then I think we might see those lifted fairly swiftly as well.”

Mr Marshall said if the state got its community transmission under control quickly it would look back into accepting the same amount of repatriated Australians.

“It’s always under review but we set our upper limit at a capacity we were comfortable with. Obviously at this point we’ve had to cancel any flights that come into SA this week because we need to preserve as much of our capacity for our medi hotels as we can.

“We need to play our part in repatriating stranded Australians stuck overseas and I think we carefully calibrated our capacity but as we know it is a very contagious disease, even when you everything right so there is still risk associated with this.”

Police Commissioner Grant Stevens said the general feeling around the SA community was to get things under control and back to where it was prior to November 15.

Mr Stevens – who is also the state co-ordinator – also clarified some restriction changes on 5AA radio.

He said private gatherings at public parks or beaches were capped at 50, all indoor social gatherings were capped at 10 people at private residents and unnecessary intrastate travel was advised against.

Unlike the maximum number of people at funerals, the cap at weddings remained at 150 but dancing while consuming alcohol is no longer allowed.

“Given the fact there is hopefully a maximum of two weeks for these imposed restrictions, it was grossly unfair to those people who had planned weddings for the next two weekends to pull the rug out from under them after they paid money, made arrangements, and potentially had people coming from interstate,” Commissioner Stevens said.

“We know this (the restrictions) causes a massive impact on businesses and individuals but this is hopefully only for a short period of time. I’ve got my fingers crossed.

“We’re not out of the woods but if we woke up this morning to find out we had another series of cases in the double digits then we ought to have been very worried about that.

“The fact so many people are lining up for testing is a real testament to the people of SA who are taking this seriously.”

Testing stations across Adelaide saw thousands of people lining up for hours, with some even being turned away.

Mr Marshall thanked South Australians for doing the right thing and getting tested.

“We knew there was going to be delays. people knew there were going to be delays but they still did it because they knew the consequences of this getting away would be absolutely catastrophic so I’m very grateful to everyone who is doing the right thing.”

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