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Worst hospitals in NSW revealed

The worst hospitals in New South Wales have been revealed, prompting Labor to call for the Berejiklian government to do more to address the “systemic healthcare crisis” in western Sydney. A new Bureau of Health Information report has revealed patients feel they are receiving a lower level of care in Bankstown, Liverpool, Nepean, Westmead and…

The worst hospitals in New South Wales have been revealed, prompting Labor to call for the Berejiklian government to do more to address the “systemic healthcare crisis” in western Sydney.

A new Bureau of Health Information report has revealed patients feel they are receiving a lower level of care in Bankstown, Liverpool, Nepean, Westmead and Fairfield hospitals than facilities elsewhere in the state.

It’s prompted the Shadow Health Minister, Ryan Park to call for more funding and staff to deal with the crisis.

The Admitted Patient Survey showed patients in these western Sydney Hospitals rated their experience significantly less favourably than those of other facilities.

While throughout the state, 67 per cent of patients rated their overall hospital care as “very good”, that was marginally different in Western Sydney.

Blacktown, Westmead, Bankstown-Lidcombe and Liverpool Hospitals received ratings between 50 and 53 per cent. Fairfield had a 57 per cent rating, and Nepean a 60 per cent.

In comparison, Singleton Hospital had the highest rating of 87 per cent.

In terms of “‘always” being treated with respect and dignity while in hospital, 86 per cent of patients across the state on average said that was true, however patients in Westmead, Blacktown and Nepean hospitals rated their experience at just 80 or 81 per cent.

Patients at Blacktown were also found to be the least likely to be able talk to a doctor if they needed, with just 47 per cent of patients reporting they “always” could do so, less than the state average of 60 per cent.

Blacktown patients were also the least likely in the state to feel involved in decisions about thier discharge and to feel they had enough information to manage care at home.

The findings have prompted NSW Labor to call for the state government to address the crisis.

The Shadow Minister for Health, Ryan Park, said healthcare should not be based on postcodes.

“Healthcare workers and doctors in Western Sydney have gone above and beyond to do the best they can with what they have. But the reality is, there’s a severe lack of funding and shocking staff shortages,” he said.

“it shouldn’t matter where you live in Sydney or NSW, everyone should receive the same level of healthcare and be able to get the medical attention they need in a timely fashion.

“This is about equality, fairness and a fundamental right to healthcare.”

The Shadow Minister for Western Sydney, Greg Warren, said the crisis had been “years in the making” as rapid population growth in the area puts “immense pressure” on the healthcare system.

“Funding and resourcing have failed to keep pace and that’s putting lives at risk,” Mr Warren said.

“Once again, Western Sydney is being left behind. Communities across Western Sydney have consistently been short-changed by the Government. Western Sydney simply wants a fair go.”

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