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Aussie icon back from the dead

Honda Motorcycles has revised and revived an Australian icon and started selling a new version of the old-school postie bike.Australia Post relied on the Honda CT110 and variants for years to deliver parcels, and retired models gained a following for use on farms or short commutes.They’re also popular with backyard mechanics, who modify them with…

Honda Motorcycles has revised and revived an Australian icon and started selling a new version of the old-school postie bike.

Australia Post relied on the Honda CT110 and variants for years to deliver parcels, and retired models gained a following for use on farms or short commutes.

They’re also popular with backyard mechanics, who modify them with upgraded hardware, or even use them as a platform to create their own custom bikes.

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“The CT125 is an ode to the postie of old and ideal for a weekend cruise or as your daily commuter – no one can escape its nostalgic charm,” Honda said at the bike’s announcement.

The new CT125 joins other reimagined Honda icons like the Monkey mini-bike and Super Cub scooter, and attracts a similar price premium.

Posties won’t be using the new Honda CT125, but for those looking for a hit of nostalgia or an efficient commuter in a unique style it offers a lot.

You’ll just have to have deep pockets.

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The CT125 landed in Australia last month, with a recommended price of $6999.

That makes it more than twice the price of a bike like Honda’s own CB125e, an easily manageable and similarly powerful road bike popular with food delivery workers and learner riders that retails for under $3300.

The slightly more sporty (though small) Honda Grom can be had for under $4900.

Retired CT110s can be picked up on the second hand market for a few hundred dollars in some cases, and you’d rarely expect to spend more than $2000 on one of them.

The newer CT125 does come with some technological upgrades though.

Firstly there’s a more precise digital dash, (though don’t expect to set any land speed records, you’d be hard pressed and ill-advised to take one over 90km/h).

It’s also got anti-lock braking, an electric starter and LED lights.

Those who have enjoyed hooning the old bikes around their private properties (and never on public roads where you are to obey all relevant laws) will be glad to hear the 4-speed semiautomatic transmission has been retained.

Fans of the old bikes have welcomed the reborn new model, even if they aren’t all racing out to buy one.

“(It) will be at least $7000 when on road,” one member of the 30,000-strong Facebook page Postie Bikes Australia said. “I love it but that is simply far too much.”

“I‘d love one for the novelty but there’s much more useful bikes around at that price,” another fan said.

Another said it was a “ridiculous price”, while a third asked people to quantify what they think would be a fair price for a brand new bike.

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